Our Pledge

Our goal is to provide the best whale viewing experience to all our passengers, making the day a memorable and fun experience and above all, savor the time they spend with us.  We aim to provide interesting and educational information about our bay and its inhabitants.  While every effort is made to ensure memorable encounters with the animals, the unpredictability of wildlife makes it impossible to guarantee sightings and interactions with 100% certainty.

We have a select license which allows us to approach the Southern Right Whales up to a distance of 50m at no wake speed.  We then stop the boat and allow the whales to control the nature and propinquity of the encounter.  Fortunately, whales are curious by nature and most times will swim up to and all around the boat.  The welfare of the animals is of utmost importance and while we want our passengers to have the best whale viewing experience that is truly unforgettable, we will not endanger the well-being of these majestic sea creatures in any way.

However, on trips where no animals that we were targeting are seen, we will issue our passengers a “RETRIP VOUCHER”. These vouchers have NO EXPIRY DATE and will be reissued as many times as it takes for you to sight the animal you were looking for.

Southern Right Whale Facts

It has very dark grey or black skin, with occasional white patches on the belly. Its two separate blow holes produce a distinguishing V-shaped blow. Southern rights have an enormous head which is up to one quarter of total body length. The callosities on the head are made of hard material, similar to human finger-nails, which appear white due to large colonies of whale lice called cyamids. The number, shape and position of the callosities are unique to each individual whale, and allow us to tell them apart. Southern right whales tend to have a large callosity at the front of the head, called a ‘bonnet’.

1 month ago

Ivanhoe Sea Safaris
Happy #PenguinAwarenessDay! Did you know that the African Penguin population has declined by around 90% in the last century? These little birds have been having a tough time recently, with habit loss, food shortages, predation by seals and climate change being just some of the challenges our flightless friends face. Here are 5 ways you can help an African Penguin today: 1) Pick up litter and fishing line you find near the beach, penguins become entangled in line and swallow bits of plastic which may end up being lethal. 2) Choose sustainably sourced seafood using the amazing SASSI list which helps you choose guilt free fish options, ensuring there's enough food for all to go around.3) Use less Plastic and Recycle. 4) Educare yourself on the threats that penguins and other marine animals face. 5) donate fish and old towels to penguin rehab centres or volunteer your time. ... See MoreSee Less
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2 months ago

Ivanhoe Sea Safaris
After a few days off sea, our team was delighted to be out and about on the ocean again yesterday afternoon. Our trip launched at 1pm with a cool breeze blowing. After a couple of days of southerly wind, the water visibility was a little milky, but the wind was certainly doing something right as it brought in 2 giant Ocean Sunfish! The Sunfish is also known as a Mola Mola and is the largest fish bearing a bony skeleton as sharks have a skeleton made of cartilage. Sunfish can weight up to 1 ton and one of the strangest creatures the ocean has managed to conjure up. They look a little bit like a pizza with fins and live primarily on jellyfish in our waters. We spent some time admiring the Sunfish as they swam below us, occasionally exposing their top fins in an almost shark like appearance. This was our first Sunfish sightings in over 6 months so it was deeply exciting for all aboard. Next up, we enjoyed a scenic view along the coast of De Kelders. The name translates into the cellars in English which is an apt description of our extensive cave system that runs all the way to Die Plaat. Once we reached the beach, we changed our course and set our sights on a piece of Sea Bamboo. As we hauled it up, we found several stowaways hiding between the fronds. The first was a collection of beautiful juvenile Cape Rock Crabs who eventually grow to reach an astonishing size with bright colors of red and orange giving their presence away in the kelp forests. In their younger form, they are almost see through and blue. We had a quick look at them before returning them to the ocean where we hope they live to reach adult hood. We also found a limpet on the stipe of the kelp plant and spoke about the diverse uses of this incredible algae before moving into deeper waters. We scoured our bay in search of mega fauna, who seemed a little elusive, so we then set our sights on the historic Danger Point Lighthouse. We stopped in this area to take in the view and talk about abalone before moving towards our Cape Fur Seal rock over in Romansbaai. The seals were perfectly camouflaged against the rock as we approached but soon revealed their blubbery bodies as they hopped into the water on our arrival. Don’t miss out on our awesome eco season delights, enquire with us below:https://whaleviewing.co.za/online-bookings/Tel: +27 28 384 0556Cell: +27 82 926 7977 #ecotour #ecosafari #seasafari ... See MoreSee Less
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2 months ago

Ivanhoe Sea Safaris
Join us for a lovely summer's day out at sea and stand a chance to see seals, seabirds and more! We've been really lucky on our last few tours, so book now for a chance to experience the Atlantic ocean at it's finest. https://whaleviewing.co.za/online-bookings/Tel: +27 28 384 0556Cell: +27 82 926 7977 #ecotour #ecosafari ... See MoreSee Less
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2 months ago

Ivanhoe Sea Safaris
Today was another fantastic day out at sea with another large pod of Common Dolphins, a Brydes Whales, Cape Fur Seals, Some African Penguins ( who even showed off their little feets) and some gorgeous seabirds. Our trip began with us hugging the shore and taking a trip down memory lane as we cruised passe the caves of De Kelders. Once we had spoken about Klipgat cave and how early man survived here, we changed course and moved parallel to the white sandy beaches of Walker Bay. As we travelled, we spotted some smartly dressed flightless friends and decided we would go in for a closer look. To our absolute delight, we had 4 very relaxed African Penguins. Penguins are by their very nature adorable, but perhaps the most adorable part of these endangered seabirds are their little feet. Today was one of those very rare occasions where these beauties decided to treat us to the sight of their tootsies as they lay on their sides, completely content with us gawking at them.After this incredible penguin sighting, we moved into deeper water where we spotted a blow. Patience was the name of the game and after some waiting, we were treated to the wonderful sight of a Brydes Whale travelling through the bay! This rorqual gave us some amazing views, surfacing gently several times for us against the backdrop of the Hermanus mountains. As we watched the whale go about his day, some white water to the west caught our eyes. Given away by the terns above, we were elated to have yet another pod of Common Dolphins moving through our area. A true delight for all, we made our way towards the pod who quickly picked up on our presence. We spent the next while enjoying the splendor of hundreds of dolphins surfing, jumping, body slamming the water and just generally having a whale of a time. There were some teeny tiny calves in this pod, with a few still showing off their fetal folds from being tucked up nice and tight in mommy’s belly. Scroll through the photos below and you will find these images captioned. After watching them feed and socialize with a cavalry of Sandwich Terns above, we made our way back to Gansbaai harbour, stopping for some naughty Cape Fur Seals before docking. Don’t miss out on our awesome eco season delights, enquire with us below:https://whaleviewing.co.za/online-bookings/Tel: +27 28 384 0556Cell: +27 82 926 7977 #ecotour #ecosafari #seasafari ... See MoreSee Less
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2 months ago

Ivanhoe Sea Safaris
What a welcome into 2021!Today we had our first tour of the year and if it’s any indication of what’s to come, this year will be a good one! With an easterly wind, we set out eager to explore Walker Bay, working our way towards the caves. Our first stop was at the drip kelders, where we found a Cape Fur Seal feasting on an octopus. We watched in awe as this pinniped made quick work of the cephalopod, tearing pieces of tentacle off before devouring the rest in one last bite.After watching this incredible sight, we visited a few more caves before picking up a piece of Sea Bamboo, which is the common name for the most abundant kelp species in the area. We spoke of how kelp is used in fertilizer for farming and how it germinates using spores before heading into deeper water. From a distance, we saw a large patch of dark water which indicated that we had some schooling fish moving through the water column. We stopped to watch the fish and talk about bait balls, with this pause yielding the highlight of our trip. As we lay in the water, we spotted splashes ahead and were elated to see dolphins moving in! These were none other than the Common Dolphins, the beauty queens of the world of cetacean. We spent the next part of our tour completely taken by these incredible toothed whales as they circled the boat, socialized and feed in front of us. We watched as they surfaced and dived below with Sandwich Terns not far behind, hoping to take advantage of the dolphins handy work. After this memorable encounter, we made our way back to Gansbaai Harbour, stopping to hang out with some more playful Cape Fur Seals. We could not have asked for a better start to our year! Our next tour is at 10am Tomorrow. To join in n the fun, follow the link below. https://whaleviewing.co.za/online-bookings/Tel: +27 28 384 0556Cell: +27 82 926 7977 #ecotour #ecosafari #seasafari ... See MoreSee Less
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2 months ago

Ivanhoe Sea Safaris
Our last to two tours out on the water were lovely, yielding several species of seabird, Cape Fur Seals and even some Brydes Whales on our last tour of the year. Our first tour on the 28th boasted a Storm Petrel, Cape Cormorants, Cape Fur Seals (including a deceased animal which had been scavenged on by some seabirds), a trip past the caves and a quick stop at Danger Point. The sunset trip brought in the whales, with us spending some time with a few Brydes Whales who were doing their best to feast on some fish in the area. In addtion to the Brydes Whales, we also saw our Cape Fur Seals as well as some Terns who were also in search of schooling fish. We have tours launching on Saturday and Sunday if you would like to begin your new year with an adventure!https://whaleviewing.co.za/online-bookings/Tel: +27 28 384 0556Cell: +27 82 926 7977 #ecotour #ecosafari #seasafari ... See MoreSee Less
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2 months ago

Ivanhoe Sea Safaris
From our family to yours, Happy Holidays! ... See MoreSee Less
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